Big Data Analytics: Hadoop®

Hadoop® is used for distributed computing and can query large data sets based on its reliable and scalable architecture.
Two major components of Hadoop® are the Hadoop® Distributed File System (HFDS) and MapReduce. This post discusses the overall roles of these two components, including their role during system failures.

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Hadoop® Distributed File System (HFDS):

HFDS big data is broken up into smaller blocks (IBM, n.d.), which can be aggregated like a set of Legos throughout a distributed database system. Data blocks are distributed across multiple servers.  This block system provides an easy way to scale up or down the data needs of the company and allows for MapReduce to do it tasks on the smaller sets of the data for faster processing (IBM, n.d). Blocks are small enough that they can be easily duplicated (for disaster recovery purposes) in two different servers (or more, depending on your data needs).

Example 1:

An example of HFDS stored data, is to think of a deck of cards, which each card holds information about what it is, value, color, symbol, etc.  HFDS can divide the data into blocks by A, 2, 3 … J, Q, & K, thus each block will hold about four card data each.  Thus, there are 13 distinct data blocks, which have been parsed by their value and placed on 13 different servers.  Let’s also assume I need higher than average availability, so rather than two copies, I need four copies of the J, Q, & K values, and 2 for A, 1, 2 … 10.  This is possible.  Each of the copies could be clustered in similar servers, or each can have one server on its own.  This type of redundancies in my data within HFDS has the benefit of higher availability of my data.  Thus, when I need to analyze my data on my deck of cards, I can say, the important values J, Q, & K have a higher chance of being available than my perceived lower value cards A, 2 … 10.

MapReduce:

MapReduce contains two job types that work in parallel on distributed systems: (1) Mappers which creates & processes transactions on the system by mapping/aggregating data by key values, and (2) Reducers which know what that key value is, will take all those values stored in a map and reduce the data to what is relevant (Hortonworks, 2013 & Sathupadi, 2010). Reducers can work on different keys.  Huge amounts of data are entered into MapReduce, then the Mapper maps the data, then the data is shuffled and sorted before it is reduced.  Once the data is reduced, we get the output that we sought.

IBM’s (n.d.) MapReduce functions using the HFDS will run its procedures on the server in which the data is stored (also known as data locality).  Keeping in mind that HFDS has at least two backup copies, if one server goes down, which can happen, it can continue doing the tasks on the same data on a different server that is working.  This backup system for disaster recovery allows for high data availability.

Example 2:

Adjusted from Sathupadi (2010), is to look at how MapReduce can calculate the sum of all of Harvard Law Students and Medical Students current outstanding school loans per degree type.  Thus, the final output from our example would be Juris Doctorate (JD) Students Current Outstanding School Loan Amount and Latin Legum Magister (LLM) Students Current Outstanding School Loan Amount, and Doctor of Medicine (MD) School Loan Amount and Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) School Loan Amount.

If I ran this in Hadoop, a single copy of the data can be stored in 50 servers, and thus 50 nodes could be used to process this transaction request in parallel, speeding up the time it would take significantly but not by 50 fold.  The reason as to why not 50 fold is because it takes the time to reduce from mapping and nodes need to talk to each other, which slows down the speed of transaction.  So, running on X amount parallel never really is like saying we are X times faster, in reality, we are X-e times faster (where e is the transaction cost).

The bad data that gets thrown out in the mapper phase would be the Undergraduate Students, Doctorate of Philosophy Students, Master Degree Students, etc.  Only JD, LLM, MD, and DO Students will get one key each assigned to them, keys that are similar to all nodes, so that way the sum of all current outstanding school loan amounts get processed under the correct group.  If data is duplicated at least twice on different servers, if a server were to go down, the MapReduce function will move on to a copy of that data in which can still be mapped and reduced.

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