Data tools: Analysis of big data involving text mining

Definitions

Big data – any set of data that has high velocity, volume, and variety, also known as the 3Vs (Davenport & Dyche, 2013; Fox & Do 2013, Podesta, Pritzker, Moniz, Holdren, & Zients, 2014).

Text mining – a process that involves discovering implicit knowledge from unstructured textual data (Gera & Goel, 2015; Hashimi & Hafez, 2015; Nassirtoussi Aghabozorgi, Wah, & Ngo, 2015).

Case study: Basole, Seuss, and Rouse (2013). IT innovation adoption by enterprises: Knowledge discovery through text analytics.

The goal of this study was to use text mining techniques on 472 quality peer reviewed articles that spanned 30 years of knowledge (1977-2008).  The selection criteria for the articles were based on articles focused on the adoption of IT innovation; focused on the enterprise, organization, or firm; rigorous research methods; and publishable leading journals.  The reason to go through all this analysis is to prove the usefulness of text analytics for literature reviews.  In 2016, most literature reviews contain recent literature from the last five years, and in certain fields, it may not just be useful to focus on the last five years.  Extending the literature search beyond this 5-year period, requires a ton of attention and manual labor, which makes the already literature an even more time-consuming endeavor than before. So, the author’s question is to see if it is possible to use text mining to conduct a more thorough review of the body of knowledge that expands beyond just the typical five years on any subject matter.  They argue that the time it takes to conduct this tedious task could benefit from automation.  However, this should be thought of as a first pass through the literature review. Thinking of this regarding a first pass allows for the generation of new research questions and a generation of ideas, which drives more future analysis.In the end, the study was able to conclude that cost and complexity were two of the most frequent determinants of IT innovation adoption from the perspective of an IT department.  Other determinants for IT departments were the complexity, capability, and relative advantage of the innovation.  However, when going up one level of extraction to the enterprise/organizational level, the perceived benefits and usefulness were the main determinants of IT innovation.  Ease of use of the technology was a big deal for the organization.  When comparing, IT innovation with costs there was a negative correlation between the two, while IT innovation has a positive correlation to organization size and top management support.

How was big data analytics learned, taught, and used in the case study?

The research approach for this study was: (1) Document Identification and extraction, (2) document classification and coding, (3) document analysis and knowledge discovery (key terms, co-occurrence), and (4) research gap identification.

Analysis of the data consisted of classifying the data into four time periods (bins): 1988-1979; 1980-1989; 1990-1999; and 2000-2008 and use of a classification scheme based on existing taxonomies (case study, content analysis, field experiment, field study, frameworks and conceptual model, interview, laboratory experiment, literature analysis, mathematical model, qualitative research, secondary data, speculation/commentary, and survey).  Data was also classified by their functional discipline (Information systems and computer science, decision science, management and organization sciences, economics, and innovation) and finally by IT innovation (software, hardware, networking infrastructure, and the tool’s IT term catalog). This study used a tool called Northernlight (http://georgiatech.northernlight.com/).

The hopes of this study are to use the bag-of-words technique and word proximity to other words (or their equivalents) to help extract meaning from a large set of text-based documents.  Bag-of-words technique is known for counting and identifying key terms and phrases, which help uncover themes.  The simplest way of thinking of the bag-of-words technique is word frequencies in a document.

However, understanding the meaning behind the themes means studying the context in which the words are located in, and relating them amongst other themes, also called co-occurrence of terms.  The best way of doing this meaning extraction is to measure the strength/distance between the themes.  Finally, the researcher in this study can set minimums, maximums that can enhance the meaning extraction algorithm to garner insights into IT innovation, while reducing the overall noise in the final results. The researchers set the following rules for co-occurrences between themes:

  • There are approximately 40 words per sentence
  • There are approximately 150 words per paragraph

How could this implementation of big data have been improved upon?

Goldbloom (2016) stated that using big data techniques (machine learning) is best on big data that requires classifying and it breaks down when the task is too small and specialized, therefore prime for only human analysis.  This study only looked at 427 articles, is this considered big enough for analysis, or should the analysis go back through multiple years beyond just the 30 years (Basole et al., 2013).  What is considered big data in 2013 (the time of this study), may not be big data in 2023 (Fox & Do, 2013).

Mei & Zhai (2005), observed how terms and term frequencies evolved over time and graphed it by year, rather than binning the data into four different groups as in Basole et al. (2013).  This case study could have shown how cost and complexity in IT innovation changed over time.  Graphing the results similar to Mei & Zhai (2005) and Yoon and Song (2014) would also allow for an analysis of IT innovation themes and if each of these themes is in an Introduction, Growth, Majority, or Decline mode.

 Reference

  • Basole, R. C., Seuss, C. D., & Rouse, W. B. (2013). IT innovation adoption by enterprises: Knowledge discovery through text analytics. Decision Support Systems, 54, 1044-1054. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com.ctu.idm.oclc.org/science/article/pii/S0167923612002849
  • Davenport, T. H., & Dyche, J. (2013). Big Data in Big Companies. International Institute for Analytics, (May), 1–31.
  • Fox, S., & Do, T. (2013). Getting real about Big Data: applying critical realism to analyse Big Data hype. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, 6(4), 739–760. http://doi.org/10.1108/IJMPB-08-2012-0049
  • Gera, M., & Goel, S. (2015). Data Mining-Techniques, Methods and Algorithms: A Review on Tools and their Validity. International Journal of Computer Applications, 113(18), 22–29.
  • Goldbloom, A. (2016). The jobs we’ll lose to machines –and the ones we won’t. TED. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/talks/anthony_goldbloom_the_jobs_we_ll_lose_to_machines_and_the_ones_we_won_t
  • Hashimi, H., & Hafez, A. (2015). Selection criteria for text mining approaches. Computers in Human Behavior, 51, 729–733. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.10.062
  • Mei, Q., & Zhai, C. (2005). Discovering evolutionary theme patterns from text: an exploration of temporal text mining. Proceedings of the Eleventh ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery in Data Mining, 198–207. http://doi.org/10.1145/1081870.1081895
  • Nassirtoussi, A. K., Aghabozorgi, S., Wah, T. Y., & Ngo, D. C. L. (2015). Text-mining of news-headlines for FOREX market prediction: a multi-layer dimension reduction algorithm with semantics and sentiment. Expert Systems with Applications42(1), 306-324.
  • Podesta, J., Pritzker, P., Moniz, E. J., Holdren, J., & Zients, J. (2014). Big Data: Seizing Opportunities. Executive Office of the President of USA, 1–79.
  • Yoon, B., & Song, B. (2014). A systematic approach of partner selection for open innovation. Industrial Management & Data Systems, 114(7), 1068.
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Business Intelligence: Data Mining

Data mining is just a subset of the knowledge discovery process (or concept flow of Business Intelligence), where data mining provides the algorithms/math that aid in developing actionable data-driven results (Fayyad, Piatetsky-Shapiro, & Smyth, 1996). It should be noted that success has much to do with the events that lead to the main event as it does with the main event.  Incorporating data mining processes into Business Intelligence, one must understand the business task/question behind the problem, properly process all the required data, analyze the data, evaluate and validate the data while analyzing the data, apply the results, and finally learn from the experience (Ahlemeyer-Stubbe & Coleman, 2014). Conolly and Begg (2014), stated that there are four operations of data mining: predictive modeling, database segmentation, link analysis, and deviation detection.  Fayyad et al. (1996), classifies data mining operations by their outcomes: prediction and descriptive.

It is crucial to understand the business task/question behind the problem you are trying to solve.  The reason why is because some types of business applications are associated with particular operations like marketing strategies use database segmentation (Conolly & Begg, 2014).  However, any of the data mining operations can be implemented for any business application, and many business applications can use multiple operations.  Customer profiling can use database segmentation first and then use predictive modeling next (Conolly & Begg, 2014). By thinking outside of the box about which combination of operations and algorithms to use, rather than using previously used operations and algorithms to help meet the business objectives, it could generate even better results (Minelli, Chambers, & Dhiraj, 2013).

A consolidated list (Ahlemeyer-Stubbe & Coleman, 2014; Berson, Smith, & Thearling 1999; Conolly & Begg, 2014; Fayyad et al., 1996) of the different types of data mining operations, algorithms and purposes are listed below.

  • Prediction – “What could happen?”
    • Classification – data is classified into different predefined classes
      • C4.5
      • Chi-Square Automatic Interaction Detection (CHAID)
      • Support Vector Machines
      • Decision Trees
      • Neural Networks (also called Neural Nets)
      • Naïve Bayes
      • Classification and Regression Trees (CART)
      • Bayesian Network
      • Rough Set Theory
      • AdaBoost
    • Regression (Value Prediction) – data is mapped to a prediction formula
      • Linear Regression
      • Logistic Regression
      • Nonlinear Regression
      • Multiple linear regression
      • Discriminant Analysis
      • Log-Linear Regression
      • Poisson Regression
    • Anomaly Detection (Deviation Detection) – identifies significant changes in the data
      • Statistics (outliers)
  • Descriptive – “What has happened?”
    • Clustering (database segmentation) – identifies a set of categories to describe the data
      • Nearest Neighbor
      • K-Nearest Neighbor
      • Expectation-Maximization (EM)
      • K-means
      • Principle Component Analysis
      • Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test
      • Kohonen Networks
      • Self-Organizing Maps
      • Quartile Range Test
      • Polar Ordination
      • Hierarchical Analysis
    • Association Rule Learning (Link Analysis) – builds a model that describes the data dependencies
      • Apriori
      • Sequential Pattern Analysis
      • Similar Time Sequence
      • PageRank
    • Summarization – smaller description of the data
      • Basic probability
      • Histograms
      • Summary Statistics (max, min, mean, median, mode, variance, ANOVA)
  • Prescriptive – “What should we do?” (an extension of predictive analytics)
    • Optimization
      • Decision Analysis

Finally, Ahlemeyer-Stubbe and Coleman (2014) stated that even though there are a ton of versatile data mining software available that would do any of the abovementioned operations and algorithms; a good data mining software would be deployable across different environments and include tools for data prep and transformation.

References

Business Intelligence: data mining success

For data mining success one must follow a data mining process. There are many processes out there, and here are two:

  • From Fayyad, Piatetsky-Shapiro, and Smyth (1996)
    1. Data -> Selection -> Target Data -> Preprocessing -> Preprocesses Data -> Transformation -> Transformed Data -> Data Mining -> Patterns -> Interpretation/Evaluation -> Knowledge
  • From Padhy, Mishra, and Panigrahi (2012)
    1. Business understanding -> Data understanding -> Data Preparation -> Modeling -> Evaluation -> Deployment

Success has much to do with the events that lead to the main event as it does with the main event.  Thus, what is done to the data before data mining can proceed successfully. Fayyad et al. (1996) address that data mining is just a subset of the knowledge discovery process, where data mining provides the algorithms/math that helps reach the final goal.  Looking at each of the individual processes we can see that they are slightly different, yet the same.  Another key thing to note is that we can move back and forth (i.e. iterations) between the steps in these processes.  These two are supposing that data is being pulled from a knowledge database or data warehouse, where the data should be cleaned (uniformly represented, handling missing data, noise, and errors) and accessible (provided access paths to data).

Pros/Challenges

If the removal of the pre-processing stage or data preparation phase, we will never be able to reduce the high-dimensionality in the data sets (Fayyad et al., 1996).  High dimensionality increases the size of the data, thus increases the need for more processing time, which may not be as advantageous on a real-time data feed into the data mining derived model.  Also, with all this data, you run into the chances that the data model derived through the data mining process will pick up spurious patterns, which will not be easily generalizable or even understandable for descriptive purposes (Fayyad et al., 1996).  Descriptive purposes are data mining for the sake of understanding the data, whereas predictive purposes are for data mining for the sake of predicting the next result of an input of variables from a data source (Fayyad et al., 1996, Padhy et al., 2012).  Thus, to avoid this high-dimensionality problem, we must understand the problem, understand why we have the data we have, what data is needed and reduce the dimensions to the bare essentials.

Another challenge that would come from data mining if we did do the selection, data understanding, or data mining algorithm selection, the step is the issue is overfitting.  Fayyad et al. (1996), defines selection as selecting the key data you need to feed into the model, and selecting the right data mining algorithm which will influence the results.  Understanding the problem will allow you to select the right data dimensions as aforementioned as well as the data mining algorithm (Padhy et al., 2012).  Overfitting is when a data mining algorithm tries to not only derive general patterns in the data but also describes it with noisy data (Fayyad et al., 1996).  Through the selection process, you can pick data with reduced noise to avoid an overfitting problem.  Also, Fayyad et al. (1996) suggest that solutions should include: cross-validation, regularization, and other statistical analysis.  Overfitting issues though can be fixed through understanding what you are looking for before using data mining, will aid in the evaluation/interpretation process (Padhy et al., 2012).

Cons/Opportunities

Variety in big data that changes with time, while applying the same data mined model, will at one point, either be outdated (no longer relevant) or invalid.  This is the case in social media, if we try to read posts without focusing on one type of post, it would be hard to say that one particular data pattern model derived from data mining is valid.  Thus, previously defined patterns are no longer valid as data rapidly change with respect to time (Fayyad et al., 1996).  We would have to solve this, through incrementally modifying, deleting or augmenting the defined patterns in the data mining process, but as data can vary in real-time, in the drop of a hat, and this can be quite hard to do (Fayyad et al., 1996).

Missing data and noisy data is very prevalent in Meteorology; we cannot sample the entire atmosphere at every point at every time.  We send up weather balloons 2-4 times a day at two points in a US state at a time.  We then try to feed that into a model for predictive purposes.  However, we have a bunch of gaps in the data.  What happens if the weather balloon is a dud, and we get no data. Hence, we have missing data.  This is a problem with the data.  How are we supposed to rely on the solution derived through data mining if the data is either missing or noisy? Fayyad et al. (1996) said that missing values are “not designed with discovery in mind”, but we must include statistical strategies to define what these values should be.  One of the ones that meteorologist use is data interpolation.  There are many types of interpolation, revolving simple nearest neighbor ones, to complex Gaussian types.

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